The Group’s accounting policies for the Consolidated Financial Statements

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

(EUR million)

1. THE GROUP’S ACCOUNTING POLICIES FOR THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of these Consolidated Financial Statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.
GROUP PROFILE
Kemira is an international chemicals group that consists of four segments: Paper, Municipal & Industrial, Oil & Mining and ChemSolutions. The Group’s main clients are industries that use a lot of water. Kemira offers solutions for water quality and volume management that help improve customers’ energy, water and raw material efficiency. Kemira’s vision is to be a leading water chemicals company.
The Group’s parent company is Kemira Oyj. The parent company is domiciled in Helsinki, Finland, and its registered address is Porkkalankatu 3, FI-00180 Helsinki, Finland. The parent company is listed on NASDAQ OMX Helsinki. A copy of the Consolidated Financial Statements is available at www.kemira.com.
The Board of Directors of Kemira Oyj has approved the Financial Statements for publication at its meeting on February 7, 2014. Under the Finnish Limited Liability Companies Act, the shareholders may accept or reject the Financial Statements at the General Meeting of Shareholders held after their publication. The meeting also has the power to make a decision to amend the Financial Statements.
BASIS OF PREPARATION FOR THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
The Group has prepared its Consolidated Financial Statements in accordance with IAS and IFRS (International Financial Reporting Standards) and the related SIC and IFRIC interpretations, issued by the IASB (International Accounting Standards Board). In the Finnish Accounting Act and the statutes under it, the International Financial Reporting Standards refer to the endorsed standards and their interpretations under the European Union Regulation No. 1606/2002, regarding the adoption of the International Financial Reporting Standards applicable within the Community. The Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements also comply with the requirements of the Finnish accounting and corporate legislation, which supplement the IFRS regulations.
The Consolidated Financial Statements are presented in million euro and it has been prepared based on historical cost excluding the items measured at fair value that are available-for-sale financial assets, financial assets and liabilities at fair value through profit or loss, and share-based payments on their grant date.
The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the group’s accounting policies. The areas which need a higher degree of judgement are significant to the Consolidated Financial Statements are presented below.
CHANGES IN ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND DISCLOSURES
The Group has applied the following new and amended standards and interpretations:
New and amended IFRSs adopted in 2013
• In the beginning of 2013, Kemira Group has applied revised Employee Benefits. The amendments to IAS 19 change the accounting for defined benefit plans. The most significant change relates to the accounting for changes in defined benefit obligations and plan assets. The amendments require the recognition of changes in defined benefit obligations and in fair value of plan assets when they occur, and hence eliminate the ´corridor approach’ permitted under the previous version of IAS 19 and accelerate the recognition of past service costs. All actuarial gains and losses are recognized immediately through other comprehensive income in order for the net pension asset or liability recognized in the consolidated balance sheet to reflect the full value of the plan deficit or surplus. Furthermore, the interest cost and expected return on plan assets in the previous version of IAS 19 are replaced with a ‘net interest’ amount under IAS 19 revised, which is calculated by applying the discount rate to the net defined benefit liability or asset. IAS 19 revised introduces certain changes in the presentation of the defined benefit cost including more extensive disclosures in Kemira's Financial Statements. The most significant changes are presented in the tables below.
The effect on the balance sheet was as follows: Liabilities for defined benefits plans Deferred tax assets Assets for defined benefit plans Deferred tax liabilities Equity
Balance as reported at 1 January 2012 52.0 2.0 44.3 10.3 1,370.8
Effect of application of IAS 19 revised 13.6 0.2 -2.7 0.4 -16.5
Restated balance at 1 January 2012 65.6 2.2 41.6 10.7 1,354.3
Balance as reported at 31 December 2012 54.9 2.7 43.6 10.7 1,314.8
Effect of application of IAS 19 revised 13.6 0.2 -2.7 0.4 -16.5
Effect on total comprehensive income for the period 18.6 0.2 -24.4 -5.1 -37.7
Restated balance at 31 December 2012 87.1 3.1 16.5 6.0 1,260.6
2012
The effect on defined benefit expenses on the consolidated income statement was as follows: 1–12
Reported defined benefit expense (+) / income (-) 9.5
Effect of application of IAS 19 revised -1.4
Restated defined benefit expense (+) / income (-) 8.1
2012
The effect on total comprehensive income was as follows: 1–12
Reported total comprehensive income for the period 28.2
Effect of application of IAS 19 revised -37.7
Restated total comprehensive income for the period -9.5
2012
The effect on earnings per share, EUR was as follows: 1–12
Reported earnings per share 0.11
Effect of application of IAS 19 revised 0.01
Restated earnings per share 0.12
• Amendment to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2012). The main change is the requirement for grouping items in ‘other comprehensive income’ based on whether they are potentially reclassifiable to profit or loss as certain conditions are fulfilled. The amendments only have an impact on the presentation of the Kemira’s Financial Statements.
• IFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The standard aims to increase uniformity by providing specific definition for fair value. It also provides both requirements for determining fair value and the required disclosures under the same standard. The requirements do not extend the use of fair value accounting but provide guidance on how it should be applied where its use is already required or permitted by other standards.
• Amendment to IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The amendments require information about financial instruments that are set off and also disclosure of information about enforceable master netting arrangements and similar agreements. The new requirements have had impact on disclosures related to financial instruments.
• Annual Improvements to IFRS 2009-2011, May 2012 (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). In the annual improvement process the non-urgent but necessary amendments to IFRS are collected and issued annually. The improvements concern five standards. The nature of the improvements depends on the standards, but they do not have material impact on the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Application of new and revised IFRSs
IASB has published the following new or revised standards and interpretations which the Group has not yet adopted. The Group will adopt each standard and interpretation as from the effective date, or if the effective date is other than the first day of the reporting period, from the beginning of the next reporting period after the effective date. The effects of these new and amended standards are under investigation.
• IFRS 9 Financial Instruments (effective date open). IFRS 9 is a several phase project which aims to replace IAS 39 with a new standard. According to the finalised classification and measurement part of IFRS 9, financial assets are classified and measured based on entity’s business model and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset. Classification and measurement of financial liabilities is mainly based on the current IAS 39 principles. The finalised general hedge accounting model of IFRS 9 allows reporters to reflect risk management activities in the financial statements more closely as it provides more opportunities to apply hedge accounting. Impairment of financial assets is the most significant still uncompleted part of IFRS 9. The standard has not yet been endorsed by EU.
• IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The standard establishes control as the base for consolidation. Additionally, the standard provides further guidance on how to apply principles of control when it is challenging to assess. According to the EU endorsement the standard is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014, but earlier application is also permitted.
• IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The standard emphases the rights and obligations of the joint arrangement rather than its legal form in the accounting. The arrangements are divided into two: joint operations and joint ventures. The standard requires joint ventures to be accounted for using equity method of accounting. Proportional consolidation of joint ventures is no longer allowed. According to the EU endorsement the standard is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014, but earlier application is also permitted.
• IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The standard includes disclosure requirements for all forms of interests in other entities, including joint arrangements, associates, special purpose vehicles and other, off balance sheet vehicles. According to the EU endorsement the standard is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014, but earlier application is also permitted.
• IAS 27 (revised 2011) Separate Financial Statements (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The revised standard includes the requirements for separate financial statements that are left after the control provisions of IAS 27 have been included in the new IFRS 10. According to the EU endorsement the standard is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014, but earlier application is also permitted.
• IAS 28 (revised 2011) Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The revised standard includes requirements for both joint operations and associates to be accounted by using equity method of accounting after IFRS 11 was issued. According to the EU endorsement the standard is effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014, but earlier application is also permitted.
• Amendment to IAS 32 Financial instruments: Presentation (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014). The amendment clarifies the conditions for net presentation of financial assets and liabilities and introduces some additional application guidance.
• Amendment to IAS 36 Impairment of assets: Recoverable Amount Disclosures for Non-Financial Assets (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014). The overall effect of the amendments is to clarify the disclosure requirements on those cash generating units which have been subject to impairment.
• Amendments to IAS 39: Novation of Derivatives and Continuation of Hedge Accounting (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014). The amendments allow the continuation of hedge accounting under IAS 39 when a derivative is novated to a clearing counterparty and certain conditions are met.
• Amendment to IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements, IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements and IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). The amendment provides additional transition relief by limiting the requirement to provide adjusted comparative information to only the preceding comparative period.
• Amendment to IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements, IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities and IAS 27 Separate Financial Statements (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2014). The amendment provides 'investment entities' (as defined) an exemption from the consolidation of particular subsidiaries and instead require that an investment entity measure the investment in each eligible subsidiary at fair value through profit or loss in accordance with IFRS 9 or IAS 39.
Annual Improvements to IFRS 20102012 and Annual Improvements to IFRS 2011–2013, both issued December 2013 (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2014). In the annual improvement process the non-urgent but necessary amendments to IFRS are collected and issued annually. The nature of the improvements depends on the standards, but they do not have material impact on the consolidated financial statements. The standard has not yet been endorsed by EU.
• IFRIC 21 Levies (effective for reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2014). The interpretation provides guidance on when to recognize a liability for a levy imposed by a government. The interpretation has not yet been endorsed by EU.
CONSOLIDATION
Subsidiaries
The Consolidated Financial Statements include the parent company and its subsidiaries. Subsidiaries are all entities over which the Group has the power to govern the financial and operating policies generally accompanying a shareholding of more than one half of the voting rights. The Group also assesses the existence of control in cases it possesses less than 50% of the voting rights but is able to govern the financial and operating policies by virtue of de-facto control. The Group’s subsidiaries are presented in the Note 34.
Subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date on which control is transferred to the Group. They are de-consolidated from the date that control ceases.
All intra-group transactions are eliminated. Intra-group shareholdings are eliminated by using the acquisition method. The consideration transferred for the acquisition of a subsidiary is defined as an aggregate of the fair values of the assets transferred, the liabilities assumed and the equity interests issued by the Group. The consideration transferred may include the fair value of any asset or liability resulting from a contingent consideration arrangement. Acquisition-related costs are expensed as incurred. Identifiable assets acquired and liabilities and contingent liabilities assumed in a business combination are measured at their fair values at the acquisition date. On an acquisition-by-acquisition basis, the Group recognizes any non-controlling interest in the acquiree either at fair value or at the non-controlling interest’s proportionate share of the acquiree’s net assets.
The amount that exceeds that aggregate of consideration transferred, the amount of any non-controlling interest in the acquiree and the acquisition-date fair value of any previous equity interest in the acquiree over the fair value of the Group’s share of the net assets acquired is recorded as goodwill. If this is less than the fair value of the net assets of the subsidiary acquired in the case of a bargain purchase, the difference is recognized directly in the income statement.
Net profit or loss for the financial year and other comprehensive income attributable to the equity holders of the parent and non-controlling interests are presented in the income statement and in the statement of comprehensive income. The portion of equity attributable to non-controlling interests is stated as an individual item separately from equity to the equity holders of the parent. Total comprehensive income shows separately the total amounts attributable to the equity holders of the parent and to non-controlling interests. The Group recognizes negative non-controlling interests, unless non-controlling interests have a binding obligation to cover losses up to the amount of their investment.
If the parent company’s ownership interest in a subsidiary is reduced but the control retains, the transactions are treated as equity transactions. When the Group ceases to have control or significant influence, any retained interest in the entity is remeasured to its fair value, and the difference is recognized in profit or loss.
The Group has applied previous provisions valid at the time to the business combinations having occurred prior to January 1, 2010.
Associates
Associated companies are companies over which the Group exercises significant influence (voting rights generally being 20-50 percent). Holdings in associated companies are consolidated using the equity method. The Group’s share of the associated companies’ net profit for the financial year is stated as a separate item in the consolidated income statement after operating profit, in proportion to the Group’s holdings. The Group’s share of its associates’ movements in other comprehensive income is recognized in Group’s other comprehensive income. If the Group’s share of an associate’s losses exceeds the carrying amount of the investment, the exceeding losses will not be consolidated unless the Group has a commitment to fulfill obligations on behalf of the associate. The Group’s associates are presented in the Note 8.
FOREIGN CURRENCY TRANSLATION
Items included in the financial statements of each of the group’s entities are measured by using the currency of the primary economic environment in which the entity operates (‘the functional currency’). The Consolidated Financial Statements are presented in euro, which is the Group’s presentation currency and the parent company’s functional currency.
In the Consolidated Financial Statements, the income statements of foreign subsidiaries are translated into euro using the financial year’s average foreign currency exchange rates, and the balance sheets are translated using the exchange rates quoted on the balance sheet date. Retranslating the net profit for the period and the other comprehensive income using different exchange rates in the income statement and in the balance sheet causes a translation difference recognized in equity in the balance sheet; the change in this translation difference is presented under other comprehensive income. Goodwill and fair value adjustments to the carrying amounts of the assets and liabilities that arise from the acquisition of a foreign entity are accounted for as part of the assets and liabilities of the foreign entity, and translated into euro at the rate quoted on the balance sheet date.
The “Hedge accounting” section describes hedging of net investments in the Group’s foreign units. When hedge accounting is applied, the exchange rate gains and losses of such loans and derivatives are credited or charged to equity, against the translation differences arising from the translation of the equity amounts as stated in the approved balance sheets of the subsidiaries. These translation differences from hedge accounting are presented under other comprehensive income. Other translation differences affecting equity are stated as an increase or decrease in other comprehensive income. When the Group ceases to have control in a subsidiary, the accumulated translation difference is transferred into the income statement as part of gain or loss on sale.
In their day-to-day accounting, Group companies translate foreign currency transactions into their functional currency at the exchange rates quoted on the transaction date. In the Financial Statements, foreign currency denominated receivables and liabilities are measured at the exchange rates quoted on the balance sheet date, and non-monetary items using the rates quoted on the transaction date. Any foreign exchange gains and losses related to business operations are treated as adjustments to sales and purchases. Exchange rate differences associated with financing transactions and the hedging of the Group’s overall foreign currency position are stated in foreign exchange gains or losses under financial income and expenses.
REVENUE RECOGNITION PRINCIPLES
Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable, and represents the total invoicing value of products sold and services rendered less; sales tax, discounts and foreign exchange differences in trade receivables as adjusting items.
The revenue from sale of goods is recognized in the income statement when the major risks and rewards related to the ownership of the goods have been transferred to the buyer.
PENSION OBLIGATIONS
The Group has both defined contribution and defined benefit pension plans in accordance with the local conditions and practices in the countries in which it operates. Pension plans are generally funded through contributions to insurance companies or a separate pension fund.
A defined contribution plan is a pension plan under which the group pays fixed contributions into a separate entity. The group has no legal or constructive obligations to pay further contributions if the fund does not hold sufficient assets topay all employees the benefits relating to employee service in the current and prior periods. A defined benefit plan is a pension plan that is not a defined contribution plan.
Typically defined benefit plans define an amount of pension benefit that an employee will receive on retirement, usually dependent on one or more factors such as age, years of service and compensation.
The liability recognized in the balance sheet in respect of defined benefit pension plans is the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period less the fair value of plan assets. The defined benefit obligation is calculated annually by independent actuaries using the projected unit credit method. The present value of the defined benefit obligation is determined by discounting the estimated future cash outflows using interest rates of high-quality corporate bonds that are denominated in the currency in which the benefits will be paid, and that have terms to maturity approximating to the terms of the related pension obligation. In countries where there is no deep market in such bonds, the market rates on government bonds are used.
Actuarial gains and losses arising from experience adjustments and changes in actuarial assumptions are charged or credited to equity in other comprehensive income in the period in which they arise.
Past-service costs are recognized immediately in income statements.
For defined contribution plans, the group pays contributions to publicly or privately administered pension insurance plans on a mandatory, contractual or voluntary basis. The group has no further payment obligations once the contributions havebeen paid. The contributions are recognized as employee benefit expense when they are due. Prepaid contributions are recognized as an asset to the extent that a cash refund or a reduction in the future payments is available.
SHARE-BASED PAYMENTS
The Group has equity-settled share-based compensation plans for key personnel and management board members, under which the Group receives services from employees as consideration for equity instrument of the Group. The potential rewards are provided partly in shares and partly in cash. The potential reward provided in shares is recognized as a personnel expense in the income statement and in the equity. Correspondingly, the rewards provided in cash are recognized as a personnel expense in the income statement and in liabilities. The total expense is recognized over the vesting period, which is the period over which the specified vesting conditions are to be satisfied.
Share-based compensation expense is determined at the grant date based on the Group's estimate of the number of shares that are expected to vest at the end of vesting period. Based on the vesting conditions, the Group revises its estimates of the number of shares expected to vest based on the balance sheet date. It recognizes the potential impact of the revision to original estimates in the income statement as a personnel expense, with the corresponding adjustment made to equity and liabilities at fair value.
Notes 5 and 32 provide information on share-based payment arrangements for key personnel and management board members.
INCOME TAXES
The Group’s tax expense for the period comprises current tax, adjustments prior tax periods and deferred tax. Tax is recognized in the income statement, except in the case it relates to items recognized in other comprehensive income or directly in equity. In this case, the tax is also recognized in other comprehensive income or directly in equity.
The current income tax charge is calculated based on tax laws enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet date in the countries where the company and its subsidiaries operate and generate taxable income. Management periodically evaluates positions taken in tax returns with respect to situations in which applicable tax regulation is subject to interpretation. It establishes provisions where appropriate on the basis of amounts expected to be paid to the tax authorities.
Deferred income tax is recognized, using the liability method, on temporary differences arising between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the Consolidated Financial Statements. However, deferred tax liabilities are not recognized if they arise from the initial recognition of an asset or liability in a transaction other than a business combination that at the time of the transaction affects neither accounting nor taxable profit or loss. Deferred income tax is determined using tax rates (and laws) that have been enacted or substantially enacted by the balance sheet date and are expected to apply when the related deferred income tax asset is realized or the deferred income tax liability is settled.
Deferred income tax assets are recognized only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profit will be available against which the temporary differences can be utilized.
Deferred income tax is provided on temporary differences arising on investments in subsidiaries and associates, except for deferred income tax liability where the timing of the reversal of the temporary difference is controlled by the Group and it is probable that the temporary difference will not reverse in the foreseeable future.
Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are offset in such cases, when there is a legally enforceable right to offset current tax assets against current tax liabilities, and when the deferred income taxes assets and liabilities relate to the income taxes levied by the same taxation authority on either the same taxable entity or different taxable entities where there is an intention to settle the balances on a net basis.
INTANGIBLE ASSETS AND PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
Development costs are capitalized as intangible assets when it can be shown that a development project will generate probable future economic benefit, and the costs attributable to the development project can reliably be measured. Capitalized development costs are presented as a separate item and amortized over their useful lives of a maximum of eight years. Capitalized development costs include material, labor and testing costs, and any capitalized borrowing costs that are directly attributable to bringing the asset ready for its intended use. Other development costs that do not meet these criteria are recognized as an expense as incurred. Development costs previously recognized as an expense are not recognized as an asset in the subsequent periods.
Other intangible assets include for instance software and software licenses as well as brands and customer list bases acquired in business combinations.
Goodwill arises from business combinations. Goodwill represents the excess of the consideration transferred over the Group’s interest in net fair value of the net identifiable assets, liabilities and contingent liabilities of the acquiree and the fair value of the non-controlling interest in the acquiree. Goodwill is measured at cost less accumulated impairment losses. Goodwill is tested for impairment annually and whenever there is any indication that an asset may be impaired. For this purpose, goodwill is allocated to cash-generating units.
Property, plant and equipment (PP&E) and intangible assets (with definite useful lives) are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization and any impairment losses. The Group has no intangible assets that have an indefinite useful life other than goodwill.
Depreciation/amortization is calculated on a straight-line basis over the asset’s useful life. The most commonly applied depreciation/amortization periods according to the Group’s accounting policies are:
• Machinery and equipment 3-15 years
• Buildings and constructions 25 years
• Intangible assets 5-10 years
The residual values and useful lives of assets are reviewed at least at the end of each financial year. Gains and losses on the sale of non-current assets are included in other operating income and expenses, respectively. Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition or construction of a qualifying asset are capitalized as part of the cost of the asset in question when it is probable that they will generate future economic benefit and the costs can be reliably measured. The costs of major inspections or the overhaul of asset performed at regular intervals and identified as separate components are capitalized and depreciated over their useful lives.
Depreciation of an asset begins when it is available for use and it ceases at the moment that the asset is derecognized.
GOVERNMENT GRANTS
Government grants for investments are recognized as a deduction from the carrying amount of these assets. The grants are recognized in the income statement as smaller depreciations over the asset’s useful life. Government grants for research activities are deducted from expenses.
LEASES
Leases involving tangible assets, in which the Group acts as a lessee, are classified as finance leases if substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership transfer to the Group.
Upon the commencement of the lease term, the finance lease assets are recognized at the lower of the fair value of the leased asset and the present value of the minimum lease payments. These assets and related rental obligations are presented as part of the Group’s non-current assets and interest-bearing liabilities. In respect of the finance lease contracts, depreciation on the leased assets and interest expenses from the related liability are shown in the income statement. Rents paid based on operating leases are expensed on a straight-line basis over the lease terms.
When the Group is a lessor, it recognizes assets held under a finance lease as receivables in the balance sheet. Assets held under operating leases are included in PP&E.
Also the arrangements that are not leases in their legal form but convey the rights to use assets in return for a payment or series of payments are treated as leases.
INVENTORIES
Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Costs are determined on a first-in first-out (FIFO) basis or by using a weighted average cost formula, depending on the nature of the inventory. The cost of finished goods and work in progress include the proportion of production overheads of the normal capacity. The net realizable value is the sales price received in the ordinary course of business less the estimated costs for completing the asset and the sales costs.
FINANCIAL ASSETS, FINANCIAL LIABILITIES AND DERIVATIVE CONTRACTS
When a financial asset or a financial liability is initially recognized on the trade date, it is measured at cost, which equals the fair value of the consideration given or received. The Group’s financial assets are classified for subsequent measurement as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss, loans and receivables issued by the Group, and available-for-sale financial assets.
Category Financial instrument Measurement
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss Currency forward contracts, currency options, currency swaps, interest rate forwards , interest rate futures, interest rate options, interest rate swaps, electricity forwards, natural gas derivatives, certificates of deposit, commercial papers, units in mutual funds, embedded derivatives Fair value
Loans and receivables Non-current loan receivables, bank deposits, trade receivables and other receivables (Amortized) cost
Available-for-sale financial assets Shares, bond investments Fair value
Financial assets at fair value through income statements
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are measured at fair value. Fair value is the amount for which an asset could be exchanged or loans paid between knowledgeable, willing parties in an arm’s length transaction. These derivative contracts to which hedge accounting in accordance with IAS 39 is not applied are classified as financial assets held for trading. These are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. In the balance sheet, these items are shown under prepaid expenses and accrued income and accrued expenses and prepaid income. Any gains or losses arising from changes in fair value are recognized through profit or loss on the transaction date in financial items.
Loans and receivables
Loans and receivables include non-current receivables carried at amortized cost using the effective interest rate method and accounting for any impairment.
Available-for-sale financial assets
Available-for-sale financial assets are measured at fair value if it is considered that fair value can be determined reliably. Unrealized changes in fair value of financial assets available for sale are recognized in other comprehensive income and presented under equity in the fair value reserve taking the tax effect into account. Accumulated changes in fair value are transferred to the income statement as a reclassification adjustment when the investment is divested or it has been impaired to the extent that an impairment loss has to be recognized. Available-for-sale financial assets include non-listed companies, the shareholdings in Pohjolan Voima Oy (PVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) representing the largest investments.
PVO and its subsidiary TVO comprise a private electricity-generating group owned by Finnish manufacturing and power companies, to which it supplies electricity at cost. PVO Group owns and operates, among others, two nuclear power plant units in Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki. The Group has A and C series shares in TVO and A, B, C, G, H and M series shares in PVO. Different share series entitle the shareholder to electricity generated by different power plants. The owners of each share series are responsible for the fixed costs of the series in question in proportion to the number of the shares, regardless of whether they use their power or energy share or not, and for variable costs in proportion to the amount of energy used.
Kemira Oyj’s holding in PVO Group that entitles to the electricity from completed power plants is measured at fair value based on the discounted cash flow resulting from the difference between the market price of electricity and the cost price. The forward electricity price quotations in Finland area published by the Nordic Electricity Exchange have been used as the market price for electricity. The cost prices are specified to each share series. Future cash flows have been discounted based on the estimated useful lives of the plants related to each share series, and water power includes terminal value. The discount rate has been calculated using the annually determined average weighted cost of capital.
Furthermore, PVO’s B2-series shares entitling to electricity from a nuclear power plant under construction at Olkiluoto 3 are based on earlier transactions.
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash in hand, demand deposits and other short-term, highly liquid investments. Items classified as cash and cash equivalents have a maximum maturity of three months from the date of purchase. Credit facilities in use are included in current interest-bearing liabilities.
Impairment of financial assets
The Group assesses any impairment losses on its financial instruments on each balance sheet date. An impairment of a financial asset is recognized when an event with a negative effect on the future cash flows from the investment has occurred. For items measured at amortized cost, the amount of the impairment loss equals the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows from the receivable. This is discounted at the financial asset’s original effective interest rate. For items measured at fair value, the fair value determines the amount of impairment. Impairment charges are recognized under financial items in the income statement.
The Group sells certain trade receivables to finance companies within the framework of limits stipulated in the agreement. The credit risk associated with these sold receivables and contractual rights to the financial assets in question are transferred from the Group on the selling date. The related expenses are recognized in the financial expenses.
Financial liabilities
Financial liabilities are classified as financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss and other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities at fair value through profit and loss include derivatives to which the hedge accounting is not applied.
Category Financial instrument Measurement
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss Currency forward contracts, currency options, currency swaps, interest rate forwards, interest rate futures, interest rate options, interest rate swaps, electricity forwards, natural gas derivatives, embedded derivatives Fair value
Other financial liabilities Current and non-current loans, pension loans, trade payables (Amortized) cost
Derivatives
The fair values of currency, interest rate and commodity derivatives and units in mutual funds as well as publicly traded shares are based on prices quoted in active markets on the balance sheet date. The value of other financial instruments measured at fair value is determined on the basis of valuation models using information available in the financial market.
Changes in the value of forward contracts are calculated by measuring the contracts against the forward exchange rates on the balance sheet date and comparing them with the counter values calculated through the forward exchange rates on the date of entry into the forward contracts. The fair value of interest rate derivatives is determined using the market value of similar instruments on the balance sheet date. Other derivatives are measured at the market price on the balance sheet date.
All of the derivatives open on the balance sheet date are measured at their fair values. As a rule, fair value changes from open derivative contracts are recognized through profit or loss under financial items in the Consolidated Financial Statements. The number of embedded derivatives used by the Group is low.
Other financial liabilities are initially recognized in the balance sheet at the initial value of received net assets deducted with direct costs. Later, these financial liabilities are measured at amortized cost, and the difference between the received net assets and amortizations is recognized as interest costs over the loan term.
HEDGE ACCOUNTING
According to IAS 39, hedge accounting refers to a method of accounting aimed at allocating one or more hedging instruments in such a way that their fair value offsets, in full or in part, the changes in the fair value or cash flows of the hedged item. Hedge accounting is applied to hedging the interest rate risk and commodity risk. The hedge accounting model in use includes cash flow hedging.
Hedge effectiveness is monitored as required by IAS 39. Effectiveness refers to the capacity of a hedging instrument to offset changes in the fair value of the hedged item or cash flows from a hedged transaction, which are due to the realization of the risk being hedged. A hedging relationship is considered to be highly effective when the change in the fair value of the hedging instrument offsets changes in the cash flows attributable to the hedged items in the range of 80-125 percent. Hedge effectiveness is assessed both prospectively and retrospectively. Testing for hedge effectiveness is repeated on each balance sheet date.
Hedge accounting is discontinued when the criteria for hedge accounting are no longer fulfilled. Gains or losses recognized in other comprehensive income and presented under equity are derecognized and transferred immediately in the income statement, if the hedged item is sold or falls due. However, gains or losses arising from changes in the fair value of those derivatives not fulfilling the hedge accounting criteria under IAS 39 are recognized directly in the income statement.
At the inception of a hedge, the Group has documented the existence of the hedging relationship, including the identification of the hedging instrument, the hedged item or transaction, the nature of the risk being hedged, the objectives of risk management and the strategy for undertaking hedging, as well as the description of how hedge effectiveness is assessed.
Cash flow hedging
Cash flow hedging is used to hedge against variability in cash flows attributable to a particular risk associated with a recognized asset or liability in the balance sheet or a highly probable forecast transaction. Interest rate and commodity derivatives are used as investment instruments in cash flow hedging. Interest rate and commodity derivatives are used as hedging instruments in cash flow hedges. Cash flow hedge accounting, specified in IAS 39 is applied by the Group to only selected hedging items. Changes in the fair value of derivative instruments associated with cash flow hedge are recognized in other comprehensive income (including the tax effect) and presented under equity, providing that they fulfill the criteria set for hedge accounting and are based on effective hedging. The ineffective portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument is recognized under financial items in the income statement. Derivatives not fulfilling the hedge accounting criteria are recognized in financial items through profit or loss.
PROVISIONS AND CONTINGENT LIABILITIES
Provisions for restructuring costs, personnel related costs, environmental obligations, legal claims and onerous contracts are recognized in the balance sheet when the Group has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of past events; it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate of the amount of this obligation can be made. A restructuring provision is recognized when there is a detailed and appropriate plan prepared for it and the implementation of the plan has begun or has been notified to those whom the restructuring concerns.
The amount recognized as a provision is the present value of the expenditure expected to be required to settle the obligation on the balance sheet date using a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the obligation.
Contingent liability is a possible obligation that arises from past events and whose existence will be confirmed by the occurrence of uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Group or a present obligation that it is not probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation; or the amount of the obligation cannot be measured within sufficient reliability. Contingent liability is disclosed in the notes.
NON-CURRENT ASSETS HELD FOR SALE AND DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS
Non-current assets are classified as assets held for sale when their carrying amount is to be recovered principally through a sale transaction and a sale transaction and a sale is considered highly probable. Since the time of classification, the assets are valued at the lower of carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell. Depreciation on these assets discontinues at the time of classification. Non-current assets classified as held for sale is disclosed separately in the balance sheet.
A discontinued operation is a component of the Group that has either been disposed of, or is classified as held for sale, and it meets one of the following criteria:
• it represents a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations,
• it is part of a single coordinated plan to dispose of a separate major line of business or geographical area of operations, or
• it is a subsidiary that has been acquired exclusively with a prospect of reselling.
The profit or loss of the discontinued operation is stated as a separate item in the consolidated income statement and statement of comprehensive income. Assets held for sale and related to other comprehensive income items are recognized in the balance sheet separately from other items.
IMPAIRMENT OF NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS
On each balance sheet date, the Group’s assets are assessed to determine whether there is any indication of an asset’s impairment. If any indication of impairment exists, the recoverable amount of the asset or the cash-generating unit is calculated on the basis of the value in use or the net selling price. Annual impairment tests cover goodwill and intangible assets not yet ready for use.
The cash-generating unit has been defined as the reportable segment. Goodwill impairment is tested by comparing the reportable segment’s recoverable amount with its carrying amount. The Group does not have intangible assets with indefinite useful lives other than goodwill. All goodwill has been allocated to the reportable segments.
The recoverable amount of a reportable segment is defined as its value in use, which consists of the discounted future cash flows to the unit. Estimates of future cash flows are based on continuing use of an asset and on the latest five-year forecasts by the business unit’s management. The annual growth rate used to extrapolate cash flows subsequent to the forecast period is assumed to be zero. Cash flow estimates do not include the effects of improved asset performance, investments or future reorganizations.
An impairment loss is recognized, whenever the carrying amount of an asset or a cash-generating unit exceeds its recoverable amount. An impairment loss is recognized in the income statement. Note 11 provides more detailed information on impairment testing.
If there has been a positive change in the estimates used to determine an asset's recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognized, an impairment loss recognized previously is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined if no impairment loss had been recognized. An impairment loss for goodwill is never reversed.
EMISSIONS ALLOWANCES
The Group holds assigned emissions allowances, under the EU emissions trading system, at its Helsingborg site in Sweden and Oulu site in Finland. Carbon dioxide allowances are accounted for as intangible assets measured at cost. Carbon dioxide allowances received free of charge are measured at their nominal value (zero). A provision for the fulfillment of the obligation to return allowances is recognized if the free-of-charge allowances are not sufficient to cover actual emissions. The Group’s consolidated balance sheet shows no items related to emissions allowances when the volume of actual emissions is lower than that of the free-of-charge emissions allowances and the Group has not bought allowances in the market. Note 31, Environmental risks and liabilities, provides information on emissions allowances.
TREASURY SHARES
Purchases of own shares (treasury shares), including the related costs, are deducted directly from equity in the Consolidated Financial Statements.
DIVIDEND DISTRIBUTION
Any dividend proposed by the Board of Directors is not deducted from distributable equity until approved by the shareholders at the Annual General Meeting.
EARNINGS PER SHARE
Basic earnings per share is calculated by dividing the profit attributable to equity owners of the parent company by the weighted average number of ordinary shares in issue during the period excluding ordinary shares purchased by Kemira Oyj and held as treasury shares. Diluted earnings per share is calculated by the adjusting the weighted average number of ordinary shares plus diluted effect of shares from the share-based payments.
NON-RECURRING ITEMS
Items that are material either because of their size or their nature are considered as one-time items. Most commonly non-recurring items are sales of assets, write-downs and restructuring of the operations. Non-recurring items are described in the board of directors´ review.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES AND JUDGEMENTS
Estimates and judgments are continuously evaluated and they are based on previous experience and other factors, such as expectations of future events that are expected to be reasonable under the circumstances.
The Group makes estimates and assumptions concerning the future. The resulting accounting estimates will, by definition, seldom equal the related actual results. The estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year are addressed below.
Estimated impairment of goodwill
The impairment tests of goodwill and other assets include determining future cash flows which, with regard to the most significant assumptions, are based on gross margin levels, discount rates and the projected period. Major adverse developments in cash flows and interest rates may necessitate the recognition of an impairment loss. For more information on goodwill impairment testing, as well as the assumptions used in the sensitivity analysis are presented in Note 11.
Estimated fair value of investment in PVO Group
The Group’s investments include non-listed shares, holdings in PVO Group representing the largest of these. The Group’s shareholding in the company is measured at fair value, based on the discounted cash flow resulting from the difference between the market price of electricity and the cost price. Developments in the actual fair value may differ from the estimated value, due to factors such as electricity prices, the forecast period or the discount rate. For more information PVO Group's fair value determination are presented in Note 14.
Defined benefit pensions
Determining pension liabilities under defined benefit pension plans includes assumptions, and significant changes in these assumptions may affect the amounts of pension liabilities and expenses. Actuarial calculations include assumptions by the management, such as the discount rate and assumptions of salary increases and the termination of employment contracts. See Note 23 for details of the calculation of the defined benefit pension assumptions.
Provisions
Recognizing provisions requires the management’s estimates, since the precise euro amount of obligations related to provisions is not known when preparing the Financial Statements.
Deferred taxes
For the recognition of deferred tax assets on tax losses and other items, the management assesses the amount of a probable future taxable profit against which unused tax losses and unused tax credits can be utilized. Actual profits may differ from the forecasts and in such a case the change will affect the taxes in future periods.